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At 29, Marcus Trescothick was widely regarded as one of the batting greats. With more than 5, Test runs to his name and a Ashes hero, some were predicting this gentle West Country cricket nut might even surpass Graham Gooch's record to become England's highest ever Test run scorer. But the next time Trescothick hit the headlines it was for reasons no one but a handful of close friends and colleagues could have foreseen. On Saturday 25 February , four days before leading England into the first Test against India in place of the injured captain Vaughan, Trescothick was out for 32 in the second innings of the final warm-up match.

As he walked from the field he fought to calm the emotional storm that was raging inside him, at least to hide it from prying eyes. In the dressing room he broke down in tears, overwhelmed by a blur of anguish, uncertainty and sadness he had been keeping at bay for longer than he knew. Within hours England's best batsman was on the next flight home.

His departure was kept secret until after close of play when coach Duncan Fletcher told the stunned media his acting captain had quit the tour for 'personal, family reasons. Until now, the full, extraordinary story of what happened that day and why, of what preceded his breakdown has never been told. He reveals for the first time that he almost flew home from the tour to South Africa - of what caused it and of what followed - his comeback to the England side and a second crushing breakdown nine months later that left him unable to continue the Ashes tour down under.

Coming Back to Me replaces the myths and rumours with the truth as Trescothick talks with engaging openness and enthusiasm about his rise to the top of international cricket; and describes with equal frankness his tortured descent into private despair. Why not your own Review for this book?

Fatal obsession

Yet many who struggle with the condition do not speak of it, too scared to show weakness in such a competitive industry. Coming Back to Me is the autobiography of Marcus Trescothick and details his rise to the top of his game and the crippling illness which resulted in the demise of his international cricket career. Winner of the William Hill Sports Book of the Year proved itself to be one of the best autobiographies in recent years, addressing the taboo subject of depression in sport.

This year's winner, A Life Too Short: The Tragedy of Robert Enke by journalist Ronald Reng also explored the issue of depression in sport and encapsulated how the illness can suffocate a person and in turn end careers, in Enkes' case his life. Trescothick's personal and soul-baring account of his psychological illness helps us to gain a better understanding of the unique pressures experienced by professional sportsmen.

Instead there's layman vocabulary like "I could see the ball in slow motion May be the intent of the book was weighed on the side of his problems than cricket.

Review: Coming Back to Me by Marcus Trescothick | Books | The Guardian

A few other negatives ,typical of many started-within-a-month-of-retirement books, aside this was a well written book to read. Most importantly one can travel with his ups and then sympathize with his condition at the time of giving up Intl cricket. I feel happy that , now, at 42 he is still banging the ball for Somerset and setting an example of how to go easy after making hard compromises in life. Jul 26, Jamesm rated it liked it. Its a pretty good book. I found myself getting frustrating reading it every time Trescothick had another bout of depression which stopped him being able to play or travel you just think 'come on, just play' , so god knows what it must have been like for him.

I found the section of the book on cricket much more interesting, however the reason I picked up the book was because of Trescothick's story and battle with depression, which made it a unique read.

Its certainly worth a read if you like cricket and or have an interest in understanding depression. Marcus Trescothick always seemed like a nice guy so I hope he is OK now and enjoying life having retired this season.

Jun 26, Ian rated it really liked it Shelves: non-fiction. Marcus Trescothick was one of the best batsmen of his generation, a left handed, top-order biffer, relying on a good eye and a straight bat rather than nifty footwork. There was something gloriously bucolic about the way he played the game see-ball-hit-ball , something innocent and transparent. I'm ashamed to say that when I heard of him pulling out of England tours through domestic problems or nervous illnesses, I was among the masses clamouring for him to man up and get out there to represent Marcus Trescothick was one of the best batsmen of his generation, a left handed, top-order biffer, relying on a good eye and a straight bat rather than nifty footwork.

I'm ashamed to say that when I heard of him pulling out of England tours through domestic problems or nervous illnesses, I was among the masses clamouring for him to man up and get out there to represent his country. The revelation of the extent of his illness was quickly followed by my sincere sympathy. In these days of never-ending seasons and non-stop media intrusion, to be a top-level sportsperson and to be perfectly well-adjusted is almost impossible.

Credit Trescothick's frank acknowledgement of that stress and the damage it can do. Dec 15, Nasir Khan rated it it was amazing. Read this as a young kid - showed me the other side of cricket, how cricketers cope with their personal lives, English cricketing culture, and how easy it is to have a nervous breakdown and collapse with the intense schedule of a cricketer that only grows increasingly in the current era.

It was a truly wonderful story of undeniably special talent, a great family that certainly nurtured Tresco's talent, traditional English breakfasts and other fatty, meaty British dishes , and of course its alwa Read this as a young kid - showed me the other side of cricket, how cricketers cope with their personal lives, English cricketing culture, and how easy it is to have a nervous breakdown and collapse with the intense schedule of a cricketer that only grows increasingly in the current era.

It was a truly wonderful story of undeniably special talent, a great family that certainly nurtured Tresco's talent, traditional English breakfasts and other fatty, meaty British dishes , and of course its always impossibly exciting to view the Ashes through the lens of a victor who was, no doubt, one of the most aggressive, explosive, yet flamboyant left-hand openers of his time and still is, for his age whilst putting forth an example of classic, gentlemanly sportsmanship that, in an ideal world, should be exemplary of any cricketer.


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A moving and entertaining biography. It explores Marcus' English cricketing career and the stress, anxiety and depression that brought it to a close. A must read for all fans of Marcus, English Cricket or just cricket in general. It shows you a side of cricket or any high level sport that is not often visible to the public. Jan 02, John Taylor rated it really liked it. I know see him in a different light.

Really good. May 04, Eddy rated it really liked it. Very interesting and unusual sports autobiography - focussing not on the cricket but on the author's mental state and depression. Sep 26, Alex rated it really liked it. With most books about sporting personalities it's unlikely you're going to have any interest in reading if you don't like the sport that said person played.

I would say that, what with cricket being quite the 'hit or miss' sport, it probably is the same with this however this is so much more than 'Marcus Trescothick's highlight reel'. For those unaware of who he is; Marcus is a professional cricket player and former opening batsmen for the England team and undoubtedly at that time, one of Englan With most books about sporting personalities it's unlikely you're going to have any interest in reading if you don't like the sport that said person played. For those unaware of who he is; Marcus is a professional cricket player and former opening batsmen for the England team and undoubtedly at that time, one of England's best batsmen as well as being part of the winning Ashes series.

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Okay so far, your average sports book. This however, as I said, is nothing of the sort. Marcus Trescothick was forced to leave England's I think it was 06 but I apologise if I'm wrong on that. It was never clear at the time, and indeed at the time of future squads he withdrew from, what the real cause behind it was. The reason we were given was first "illness and personal problems" and then "stress related illness" He was eventually forced to retire from international cricket as a result of this but until I actually read the book I still didn't really know what this "stress related illness" was.

At the time I, and probably quite a few outsiders, were saying "Come on Marcus, just pull yourself together and get back out there". So I was naturally intruiged to read this and get to the bottom of what was really going on. It makes for harrowing reading at times and he says himself that upon writing this, having to go back and remember what he went through was a very unpleasant experience.

What starts off for him as serious homesickness and sleeping trouble when on tours away from his family turns into something a lot more serious; nights spent crippled with fear at what might be happening back home to the point where he felt he was going to die and even had the thought of taking his own life to stop himself having to live through what he was having to.

In the end, despite all the help he sought out, everything he tried he was forced to retire from international cricket as even a short pre-season tour with his county became too much for him. It's sad, there's no other word for it and it had me on the verge of tears. In fiction you can write whatever you want to tug at the heart strings of the reader.

This actually happened; Marcus Trescothick did actually break down in tears at Heathrow airport when trying to board the plane to Dubai, he did actually have to give up doing what he loved because of something, for the most part, he couldn't get his head around and couldn't comprehend. This book won the William Hill Sports Book of the year in and it was well deserved. As I've said, so much more than your average 'Look how well I did' sports personality effort. Feb 28, Ashok Sridharan rated it really liked it. By way of background: the author Marcus Trescothick was an English cricketer who played for England in test and limited overs cricket from to as a batsman.

He was one of the best opening batsmen in the world during that period and one of the pillars of the English cricket team. He was nearing the peak of his career when an on going battle with depression forced him out of the game forever. Coming back to me is partly an autobiography ghost written by Peter Hayter and partly a narrativ By way of background: the author Marcus Trescothick was an English cricketer who played for England in test and limited overs cricket from to as a batsman.

Coming back to me is partly an autobiography ghost written by Peter Hayter and partly a narrative of Trescothick's battles with depression, particularly the later chapters. It is a refreshingly honest account which, in many places, is touching. Having seen Trescothick dominate the best bowlers in the world in his prime, it was moving to know the extraordinary odds he had to overcome to reach as far as he did. In many ways Coming back to me is a pathbreaking work.

Not many sports persons, and certainly no cricketer ever came out openly on the subject of depression, much less write a book on it. Given the frequency of suicides among cricketers, its impossible to overstate the significance of this book. You assuredly do not need to be a cricket fan to appreciate this novel.

Its a touching, brutally honest account of a sportsman's battle against depression. Marcus Trescothick provides an honest and brutal autobiographical account that continues to haunt long after you have read it. By all accounts, Marcus Trescothick was living a life of his dreams. Blessed with a loving and caring family, he loved doing his job which was to bat for England cricket team. Pretty decent at his job, he was making rapid strides and seemed destined for greatness, until, it all fell apart. Marcus Trescothick was diagnosed with stress related illness - depression and anxi Marcus Trescothick provides an honest and brutal autobiographical account that continues to haunt long after you have read it.

Marcus Trescothick was diagnosed with stress related illness - depression and anxiety, triggered by certain incidents in his life and continuos pressure of representing England at the highest level. The book presents quite graphic and moving account of his struggles and talks about one of the greatest taboos of the sport.

Certain passages move you, some even disturb you, but in its entirety, the book engages you. Trescothick rarely loses his wit and comes up with a clever line or two even at the most tense situations. Never a dull moment, this is an interesting and probably one of the most important books which talks about the most misunderstood and least talked about aspect of sports. This is a book which goes way beyond cricket and sports.

Marcus Trescothick is without a doubt one of the greatest England batsmen it has been my pleasure to watch. Trescothick was a hero of mine before I read this book and that view has only been strengthened now that I have read this deserved winner of the William Hill Sports Book of the Year. Jul 02, Peter rated it liked it Shelves: biography , sport , cricket-lovely-cricket.

This guy knocked , opening for England at Lord's whilst on Citalapram! Some of which, it strikes me, is written with the decided intent of setting some records straight. The eventual honesty of Marcus Trescothick's disclosure brought the whole issue of depressive illness into the public domain with an air of seriousness that went some way to dispelling the stigma associated with a sil This guy knocked , opening for England at Lord's whilst on Citalapram!

The eventual honesty of Marcus Trescothick's disclosure brought the whole issue of depressive illness into the public domain with an air of seriousness that went some way to dispelling the stigma associated with a silent illness that is effecting around 1 in 10 people in the U. K at any given point every year.

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Coming Back To Me: The Autobiography of Marcus Trescothick

Good to bear in mind that this guys job was public property, his performances were under close minute by minute analysis and scrutiny. Few could cope with that pressure alone, suffering from depression or not. Mar 31, Ivor rated it it was amazing. This biography is completely unlike any other sporting 'autobiography' churned out by sportsmen approaching the end of their career I've ever read.

Trescothick gives a candid insight into the way in which his depression affected him and his family. It offers a behind the scenes look into how his illness was handled by England and how Trescothick continued to try and cover the illness up even when it was apparent something was nqr. In addition to the way in which the book handles his illness there This biography is completely unlike any other sporting 'autobiography' churned out by sportsmen approaching the end of their career I've ever read. In addition to the way in which the book handles his illness there is also the inevitable showcase of his career.

The section on the Ashes is in particular worthy of a read! I'm planning to donate this book to the school library and would certainly recommend it to you boys Sep 13, Matt Farrelly rated it liked it. This book highlights why, and details his battle with depression an illness to be taken seriously and that so many men and women suffer and seems to be synonymous with the pressure cooker demands of international cricket Jonathan Trott was another.

A good read and answered a lot of the questions I had regarding his disappearance from cricket. Feb 11, Darren O'Toole rated it it was amazing. When you hear about athletes suffering from depression, or anyone suffering from it for that matter, I personally have a picture in my head about what they are going through. Marcus's excellent book made me rethink this view. The clear turmoil that he was going through, was something that I hadn't considered possible - particularly of an athlete at that level.

The self-doubt, the fear, all whilst playing stunning cricket. The rise in the number of cricketers leaving tours with 'stress-related il When you hear about athletes suffering from depression, or anyone suffering from it for that matter, I personally have a picture in my head about what they are going through. The rise in the number of cricketers leaving tours with 'stress-related illness' makes this book a must-read to understand what this really means.

Brilliant That marcus and others like him are being so honest about his illness is what is helping fight the stigma of mental illness today. The book is honest and a true insight of what it is like to fight of a mental illness and that it is the same as a physical illness Well done marcus for writing your story and being so honest. Sep 03, Rohit rated it it was amazing.

One of those books that start with cricket but end way beyond it. You cant help but appreciate marcus' honesty, it will make you sad at times to think about how everything turned out for him when all he ever put on display was an amazing talent and a promising career. The part where he talks about Ashes and the importance it had had in his career throughout, and where he describes his anxiety taking a toll on him will make you feel to be right in his shoes. Amazingly written! Jul 27, Vanessa rated it it was amazing. What a fabulously honest book. I admire MT for putting pen to paper and writing about the stress and depression he suffered.


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  4. It can't have been an easy thing to do. This book is a great read for cricket lovers, however I'd recommend it highly to anyone who has ever suffered from stress or depression, or has anyone close to them who suffered from this illness. Aug 13, Ramakanth Josyula rated it it was amazing. While written by a cricketer and a lot of chapters are dedicated to his matches, the book is about Trescothicks battle with depression and anxiety.

    This is a must read for anyone whose response to depression is "get over it" or if they think it is just a weakness. Reading what he went through is horrifying and tells you how bad it is for someone who is going through it. Oct 02, Venky rated it really liked it Shelves: bibliocase. One of the finest left handed openers for England comes out clean in a no holds barred account of the scourge of depression and the effect that it can have on sportsmen with frenetic game schedules.

    A brave and inspiring book which perhaps paved the way for many closet depression players to come out into the open and seek help. Feb 15, Hilda rated it it was amazing.